Sep 282016
 
Great Conversations on Digital Transformation

I’m sure our invitation isn’t the only one you’ve received to a conference on digital transformation. So, you’re probably wondering, what makes Cutter’s Summit 2016 — focused on digital transformation — different and worth spending the time and money on? Here are just 3 of the many ways that the Summit stands out: 1. No lectures, no talking heads. Every session is interactive. There’s a case study session, where you’ll work through the GE and the Industrial Internet case; first on your own, reading the case before you even arrive in Boston, and then with a small group of your peers at the Summit, and finally in a high-energy conversation facilitated by Harvard Business School Read more

Sep 262016
 
STEM Crisis is Really a Knowledge Shortage, according to Charette

Cutter Fellow Bob Charette’s 2013 assertion that The STEM Crisis is a Myth inspired quite a bit of discussion in education and industry, which is has apparently not subsided! In STEM Literacy and Jobs, wsj.com blogger Irving Wladawsky-Berger taps Charette for his thoughts on the STEM jobs “crisis.”   When it comes to STEM, the discussions have mostly focused on STEM jobs rather than STEM literacy, and in particular, on whether we have a STEM crisis or a STEM surplus–a debate I recently wrote about. A number of articles have pointed out that, as is often the case with such complex questions, both sides are right. It all depends. STEM includes a variety of disciplines, Read more

Aug 102016
 
Call for Papers: Fintech and the Digitization of Financial Services

We are currently in the midst of the Fintech revolution. It is evident that technology is significantly transforming and disrupting the financial services landscape. This presents significant opportunities and challenges for incumbents, start-ups and regulatory bodies. Fintech is evolving, moving beyond simply being the realm of start-up disruptors, with many incumbents now making significant R&D investments and many are collaborating with start-ups. Both interest and investment in Fintech has exploded in the last few years. Fintech, the intersection between finance and technology, has experienced a 67% growth in investment in the first quarter of 2016, with investment reaching $5.3 billion (Accenture, 2016). PwC (2016) report that 83% of financial companies believe that specific aspects of Read more

Jul 262016
 
Levels of Architectural Understanding

Early on in my EA career, I was very fortunate to become involved in a pioneering EA initiative at Westpac. My introduction to Westpac came when I helped its Group Data Resource Management team develop tool and repository support for its enterprise business model. During this engagement, I kept hearing people refer to an exciting but very hush-hush project that went under the code name “CS90.” I was intrigued and determined to find out more. That proved very difficult because the project was so leading-edge and innovative that all its documentation was marked at the highest level of secrecy. To make it even harder for competitors to find out what Westpac was doing, CS90 was divided Read more

Jul 262016
 
Cognitive-Based Solutions for Assessing Risk in Banking and Finance

Cognitive computing is starting to impact the enterprise by changing the way data is analyzed and the manner in which employees and customers interact with computerized systems. This is happening across various industries, ranging from healthcare and retail to banking and financial services. Since I have been delving into the financial area of late, I wanted to provide a glimpse into how banks and other financial institutions are utilizing cognitive applications and commercial solutions within their organizations. Key Drivers Key trends driving cognitive into banking and finance include: Massive data sets. Finance and banking firms are facing an increasing need to analyze very large data sets consisting of structured and unstructured data for exploration and discovery, Read more

Jul 212016
 
Call for Papers - Cognitive Computing: The Future Has Arrived!

In the 1980s, everyone got excited about the possibility of artificial intelligence. The excitement grew for a few years and then gradually faded as companies found that it was too hard to build and maintain useful expert systems or natural language interfaces. However, there has been a renewed interest in developing software applications that can interact with people in natural languages, perform complex decision-making tasks, or assist human experts in complex analysis efforts. Today these systems are called cognitive computing systems or machine learning. They rely on research from artificial intelligence laboratories and use new techniques like deep learning and reinforcement which seem to overcome some of the problems that were encountered with earlier AI Read more

Agility and Stability

 Posted by on Jun 28, 2016  1 Response »
Jun 282016
 
Agility and Stability

The world is in a time of rapid change resulting from the usual culprits: The integrated economies and labor market have created a “flat world. The Internet has reduced friction in the marketplace The accessibility of data has revolutionized target marketing The low cost of processing, storage, and software environments (e.g., Java, Python, R) has made application development efficient, enabling innovation and disruptive technology. In the past, building business was associated with stability — creating an organization of lasting value that persisted even through a change of management or some market structure change. Running a business in the face of today’s changes, however, alters the nature of business management. “Agility” is the facility of quick response Read more

Jun 142016
 

The boundary between machine capabilities and what once seemed uniquely human has certainly moved over the years, justifying concerns that the relatively new field of roboethics addresses. Roboethics goes beyond job losses and looks at the impact of robotization on society as a whole; that is the major topic here. (I will address job losses at the end.) An algorithm can be unethical in both obvious and subtle ways. It could be illegal, as may have been the case with Volkswagen’s engine management algorithms for its “clean” diesel engines. It could be unethical in the sense that it violates a sense of fair play. More subtly, an algorithm could take on decision-­making roles that a Read more

Jun 142016
 
How to Architect a Data Lake

“How do you architect a lake?” If the question sounds like the opening line of a joke, the answer would clearly come as: “You don’t. You can only discover one.” Whether it is data warehouses or marts, data lakes, or reservoirs, the IT industry has a penchant for metaphor. The subliminal images conjured in the human mind by the above terms are, in my opinion, of critical importance in guiding thinking about the fundamental meanings and architectures of these constructs. Thus, a data warehouse is a large, cavernous, but well-organized location for gathering and storing data prior to its final use and a place where consumers are less than welcome for fear of being knocked Read more

Jun 102016
 
Think you're making rational business decisions? Think again.

Cutter Senior Consultant Barry Devlin is passionate about extending BI approaches into true business insight. His four-part series over at Upside.com digs into the science of decision making (hint: we’re less rational than we think!) and how that fits with current BI tools (hint: not very well). Here’s an excerpt from How Do You Make Decisions? (Part 4). In my book, Business unIntelligence: Insight and Innovation beyond Analytics and Big Data, I developed a conceptual model for decision making support in today’s world. This model consists of three “thinking spaces.” Two of these are obvious and long-recognized: information and process. However, I also explicitly included a people space in the conceptual architecture, sitting atop the Read more