Nov 202015
 

The role of enterprise architecture and the enterprise architect has steadily grown in scope and in importance over the last two decades. Although many EA teams operate as part of the IT department, others are taking a more active position as they help to inform and guide strategy planning, investment and transformation at the enterprise-level. We have reached a stage where EA, as a discipline, is well-established within many enterprises as a core capability.

But increasingly the boundary of “enterprise” architecture is extending beyond organizational boundaries. The domain of the enterprise architect is changing, as more and more “enterprise” architecture components are sourced externally. Social and environmental architectures are as important to an enterprise architecture as the components that remain within the enterprise boundary and under the direct control of the EA team.

Emerging technologies and digital disruption will transform the enterprise, but they will also transform the ways in which we architect.

What will this mean for enterprise architecture in general, or for the role of the enterprise architect? How will EA help enterprises to collaborate with one another? What will these changes mean for the nature of the enterprise and its architecture?

An upcoming issue of Cutter IT Journal with Guest Editor Roger Evernden seeks insight on the emerging role of enterprise architecture and the enterprise architect as organizations transform and react to emerging technologies and digital disruption.

Possible discussion points include those mentioned above, as well as, but not limited, to the following:

  • Which technologies are likely to have the biggest impact and cause most disruption to the future of the enterprise, and consequently its enterprise architecture?
  • How will EA cope with the switch from enterprise to environmental architectures?
  • What is the nature of the social and environmental architectures that will play such an important role in the future of EA?
  • What part will systemic outcomes play in this future? For example, dwindling energy, food, or water resources? Integrated transport networks? The smart city?
  • What new domains are likely to come under the province of the enterprise architect?
  • Are we likely to see a blurring of the distinction between enterprise and building architecture?
  • Will there be any new roles or responsibilities for the enterprise architect of the future?
  • What new risks or benefits do we face as we respond to emerging technologies and digital disruption?
  • How can an enterprise architect control or govern EA components that are developed and managed outside the enterprise?
  • Are these changes an opportunity for enterprise architects to make a significant, positive difference in our world? If so, how?
  • What can EA teams or individuals do now to prepare for these changes?

TO SUBMIT AN ARTICLE IDEA: DEADLINE DECEMBER 7, 2015

Please send an email to Christine Generali, cgenerali[at]cutter[dot]com and Guest Editor Roger Evernden, reverenden[at}cutter[dot]com and include an abstract and a short article outline showing major discussion points, and a brief bio of the author(s).

ARTICLE DEADLINE: January 8, 2016

EDITORIAL GUIDELINES

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Christine Generali

Christine Generali is a Group Publisher for Cutter Consortium - responsible for the editorial direction and content management of Cutter's flagship publication, Cutter IT Journal.

Discussion

  One Response to “Disruption and Emergence: What does it mean for Enterprise Architecture?”

  1. it very helpful and informative……and also you can use enterprise architecture tools and software…

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