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Vince Kellen, Ph.D.

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Vince Kellen, Ph.D. is a Senior Consultant with Cutter's Business Technology & Digital Transformation Strategies and Data Analytics and Digital Technologies practices. Dr. Kellen's 25+ years of experience involves a rare combination of IT operations management, strategic consulting, and entrepreneurialism. He is currently CIO at the University of Kentucky, one of the top public research institutions and academic medical centers in the US. Read more ...

Mar 262016
 

Life complexifies. Perhaps it is a fundamental law of information that the complexity of information increases. In the world of biology, over time organisms become more complex, with new genetic permutations appearing alongside of old genetic pieces. In the hyperastronomical space in the animal genome, nature constantly produces new combinations. In human knowledge and scientific discovery, the same is true. New insights are built on top of old ones. Breakthroughs in insight usually have higher levels of complexity and hence require higher levels of abstraction and difficult codification to accommodate the widening domain covered. We all know E=MC2 but how many of us really know what it means? In the world of medicine, treatments are Read more

Dec 152015
 
Looming Threats in Cloud Computing

A lot has changed in a few years. When I talked about cloud three years back, I got frownie-faces from my peers. Skeptical looks that belied a deeper-seated fear or trepidation, probably having more to do with their internal image of what a CIO should be than the promise or peril in the new technology. Now, enthusiasm runs ebulliently through the vendor community, animating the animal spirits and spurring on entrepreneurs in search of profits and glory. Cloud has been elevated to high strategy on the billionaire chess board. Mergers and acquisitions are abuzz. Amazon, armed with an overly energetic workforce, gets hypercompetitive in all ways good and ill, supplanting Oracle as one of our Read more

Jul 282015
 
Brain Design-Inspired Computing Is Here

Computing inspired by the design of brains is rapidly progressing. Very rapidly. Companies like IBM and Qualcomm are financing neurochip projects, and in the case of IBM’s Cognitive Computing push, it may be betting its own future on neuromorphic technology. Europe is investing US $1.3 billion in the Human Brain Project, which sets out to simulate the human brain. Not to be left behind, the US announced in 2013 it is investing $300 million in its own Brain Initiative with similar objectives. Researchers in the UK, Canada, at Stanford University, and at DARPA are all working on various aspects of the neuromorphic computing puzzle, and are now publishing their results. Deep thinkers like Stephen Hawking and tech billionaires like Bill Gates and Elon Musk ominously warn about the Read more

Feb 102015
 
Big Data and the Mirror of Erised

“This mirror will give us neither knowledge or truth.” So says Dumbledore in J.K. Rowling’s book, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, commenting on a mirror that shows us what our most desperate desires want us to see. This is an apt analogy when describing the analytics available in big data solutions. When you suddenly have all the data you could want and can quickly analyze it anyway you like, unencumbered by extraneous effort that we have historically had to endure, what happens? Being human beings with a tendency to confirm what we so want to have happen or to relive what felt so good in the past, managers often drift into self-sealing and circular analysis Read more

Dec 022014
 
The IaaS Battleground

The uncertain future of cloud computing and the plethora of frowny CIO faces of a couple years ago are rapidly giving way to the acceptance — if not embracing — of infrastructure as a service (IaaS), at least among IT leaders. The good news is that this shift is without the typical knee-jerk and shallow skepticism or naive Panglossian enthusiasm for the next new thing. This mental shift is tempered, real, and comes with more “buy” questions than “hold” or “sell” ones. In short, buyers and sellers are rolling up their sleeves and making plans. Google, Amazon, and Microsoft are in what looks to be an all-out race to zero as they take oxygen out Read more

Jul 152014
 

In research and in economic innovation, great insight and great value are frequently created by individuals with stocks of knowledge in two or more domains and by teams of people where the individuals might be experts in one domain but have the facility to grasp enough of another domain to connect the dots. In universities across the globe, more and more research is being done by multidisciplinary teams. While deep expertise in one domain is needed to perform well on these teams, facility with — if not some significant expertise in — another domain is also needed. Tomorrow’s problems and the innovation needed to solve them are likely to require multiple disciplines. One person with Read more

Feb 062008
 

Beat ’em up. Knock ’em down. Slap ’em around. Keep them on a short leash. Teach them a lesson. Make ’em behave. Vendors, that is. This phrase has recently seeped into common IT parlance. I’ve even heard vendors, typically large ones, say that the reason we should buy their wares is that they can then provide us with this pugilistic benefit. Fascinating. A value proposition predicated on giving customers the right to beat up the vendor! Where do I sign? This idiom reflects elided thinking regarding risk. Managers seeking throats to choke, I believe, are simply displacing anger or carrying around naïve ideas about risk. Hopefully it is the latter since that is more easily Read more