Nov 162015
 
Cutter Experts Honored for Leadership Course

Cutter Fellow Rob Austin and Senior Consultant Shannon Hessel received a Danish Society for Education and Business Prize for their “Leadership in the 21st Century Organizations” course at Copenhagen Business School. Cutter Fellow Dick Nolan was also honored for the lectures he contributed to the course. One of the three DSEB Education Prizes went to Assistant Professor Shannon Hessel and Professor Rob Austin from the Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy, especially due to their work in the course: “Leadership in the 21st Century Organizations”, in which they combine technology with good old-fashioned storytelling. – via CBS Observer Congratulations, Rob, Shannon, and Dick!

Nov 122015
 
Bob Charette Weighs in on a Decade of IT Failures

Cutter Fellow Bob Charette has been blogging over at IEEE Risk Factor for the past decade, looking at the myriad ways software projects fail. To mark that 10-year milestone, he set out to analyze what’s changed — and what hasn’t — in the area of systems development- and operations-related failures. Bob doesn’t claim to have compiled a comprehensive “database of debacles” in Lessons From a Decade of IT Failures. Instead, he’s endeavored to bring together the “most interesting and illustrative examples of big IT systems and projects gone awry.” Be sure to spend some time with his colleague Josh Romero’s five super cool interactive visualizations of the data where you’ll: Look at the various ways Read more

Nov 032015
 
Considering Group Dynamics in Agile Adoption

Understanding individuals and how they interact with each other is one of the key priorities of Agile. In fact, the very first statement of the flagship Agile Manifesto highlights this priority. When individuals interact positively with each other, they promote the group’s common goal. This is collaboration. Honest collaboration invariably challenges the inherently territorial nature of humans. We love to hold on to our spaces and boundaries (both geographical and mental). Collaboration permeates those boundaries and makes them porous. The need to break down the territorial mindset in humans is perhaps the hardest thing to comprehend and accept in an Agile culture change. Promoting collaboration fundamentally depends on understanding how two (or more) individuals interact Read more

Oct 202015
 
The Gamification of Ordinary Life

At the annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES), attention turned once again to the Internet of Things (IoT) and personal devices. Wearables showed up in great profusion, focused upon watches, wristbands, and other personal sensors used to monitor activity rate, pulse, temperature, and whatever else can be determined from movement or simple surface sensors. For the home, measuring and control devices are emerging for temperature, humidity, intruder detection, and so forth — all attached, to personal networks, to the Web, and generally streaming data to external monitors. This all constitutes an escalation of device communications, which ultimately can lead to something like gamification of personal life and the home (Figure 1). Figure 1 — The gamification Read more

Oct 062015
 
Same Tune, Different Lyrics?

A person who lived through the introduction of digital automation in the 1950s could be forgiven for having a sense of déjà vu. Once again, there is a growing feeling of unease in the public that perhaps digital automation has progressed to a point where this latest generation of “smart machines” will indeed cause massive unemployment of today’s workers. Feeding this nervousness are recent pronouncements by Microsoft founder Bill Gates, who has said that “20 years from now, the labor demand for lots of skill sets will be substantially lower,” or by technology professors Carl Frey and Michael Osborne from Oxford University’s Martin School, who claim that an estimated 47% of US jobs are at Read more

Sep 302015
 
Strategy And Backlogs Exist To Be Adjusted

During today’s webinar about ALM, I took great pains to talk about what constitutes a real strategy for software innovation, and what an imitation strategy looks like. Many of the questions we receive at Cutter, such as, “What scaled Agile approach should we pursue?” are impossible to answer without a strategy to guide these sorts of decisions. Before talking about scaled Agile, or whatever the topic du jour is, we first must backtrack into a discussion of the strategic imperatives behind these questions — assuming anyone knows what those imperatives are. One of the hardest aspects to understand about strategy, either for ALM or anything else, is that it’s not written on stone tablets. Strategy is made Read more

Sep 082015
 
Perceptions of Time in EA Teams

We all have different perceptions of time, and our individual perceptions are influenced by the culture and norms of an enterprise. Our experiences of time have been researched and studied from many perspectives. For example, think about attitudes to the following in various enterprises or cultures: What is the attitude toward time-keeping? Do meetings start on time, stick to their agenda, and end on time? How many clocks are there in a building or meeting room? Do people keep checking the time? Is it acceptable to arrive late for meetings or appointments? How much time is allocated to different tasks? Do you have enough time to think properly about the vision? How often does it Read more