Dec 132013
 
Lean, Devops and the Resurgence of the Industrialization of Software

One the constant tensions in our industry is the business need to make software more like manufacturing — highly predictable and controllable — and the reality that much of the software development lifecycle is not amenable to the process control techniques that are so effective in manufacturing. Software development is different than manufacturing in that: There is a wide range of uncertainty. Software efforts span from green field projects with little initial understanding of the needed system to bug fixes and small changes with very detailed specifications. There is an indirect relationship between the effort expended and value created. Generally, if one spends 10 hours painting a wall, one can expect there will a lot Read more

Which MDM?

 Posted by on Dec 12, 2013  No Responses »
Dec 122013
 
Which MDM?

In 2014, a number of vendors will emphasize Multi Database Management (MDM) tools in the cloud. Through the magic of marketing, we will somehow deal with the conflicting acronym generated as a result (Mobile Device Management). These tools will be available as Software as a Service and will create virtual databases to serve cloud-based BI. The value proposition will be the “democratization” of Big Data. [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the annual “Cutter Predicts …” series.]

Dec 112013
 
Collaboration and Social Tools in 2014

For 2014, I predict … 1. The browser becomes the OS. More and more is being added to Google’s Chrome browser; so much so that it is starting to look much like an operating system. You have all of these plug-ins (like applications), you can customize and configure your device or the look and feel of the browser. Nowhere is Chrome more an OS than with Chromebooks, where it is the OS. And it is a very web-oriented OS (thin client), with just the browser, media player and file manager as its only native applications. The question is: will IE or Firefox follow suit? Or are they pursuing different directions? 2. The social enterprise. As a Read more

Dec 102013
 
2014: The Failure of Agile Software Development is Taken Seriously

What happened in the past: Agile is all the hype in Software Development and the talk at the golf courses across the country. Consultancy and certification are booming and rumor has it that all software development projects will now end as a success: faster, cheaper, better. What is really going on: More and more software developers are realizing that agile is being implemented as a hype. Processes become iterative. Documents are replaced by tools that maintain a backlog. Customers are still at a far distance from teams. People are still called resources. Cheap labor is still used to “reduce costs”. A few honest managers are aware that nothing is really changing. Quality is not improving, Read more

Dec 092013
 
Stealth Enterprise Architecture!

This year I’m predicting more stealth enterprise architecture! I’d like to say that I invented this phrase, but I’ve found at least two previous uses: one in a comment by Peter Parslow in 2010; the other from Alec Blair, the head of Enterprise Architecture for Alberta Health Services, who described the journey of how his team has used stealth Enterprise Architecture to move AHS to operate more consistently like one organization. Now, Enterprise Architects have always had to play the political game and use stealth to sell their EA visions. Tricking decision makers into taking small steps that in combination cause longer-term transformation has long been part of the art of EA. At an Enterprise Read more

Dec 082013
 
Things That Go Bump in the Night

By the end of the decade, self-driving cars will be on the roads in many developed countries. The electric grid will tell our heaters when it is more economical to run, “learning thermostats” will be in many homes, and we will track the movements of people, pets, packages, and many other things. By some estimates, the number of devices connected to this “Internet of Things” (IoT) will pass the number of connected human users by 2016. The question is: will serious accidents be necessary before people take the risks seriously and harden this infrastructure? Because the IoT senses and controls physical objects, serious harm can happen — either accidentally or intentionally. We need devices to Read more

Dec 072013
 
We Will Forget the ACA Web Site Fiasco

In a few months, the Affordable Care Act enrollment system will finally be working well, millions of people will have enrolled, and the debate will return to the basic policy and political question of whether the whole program is good for the U.S. or not. By 2015, the IT profession as a whole, government procurement services, and the contractors will forget the lessons of the October-November fiasco and will largely or completely return to the same practices as before: unrealistic deadlines, lack of testing, big waterfall lifecycle models, tell-me-what-I-want-to-hear practices, etc. Why am I being so pessimistic? Because we’ve been here before. The Y2K effort consumed a lot of resources, and contrary to many people, Read more