Posts Tagged 'Agile Project Management'

Serious Games Need Agile

 Posted by on Nov 20, 2013  1 Response »
Nov 202013
 
Serious Games Need Agile

In my last post, I talked about the ways in which serious games can fill a significant hole in Agile practices. Let’s turn that around and see how Agile can help serious games. Before we can get into the meat of that topic, it’s important to be clear about which serious games we’re going to be discussing. There’s a wide variety of game-like activities used for reasons other than entertainment (education, ideation, market research, etc. etc.), and not all of them can benefit from serious games equally, or even in the same ways. For our purposes, we’ll be focusing on three types: Software-based serious games in general. This is a pretty broad category, encompassing everything Read more

Nov 122013
 

Agile’s success depends, to a great extent, on the seriousness with which the team performs the prescribed ceremonies. Thou shalt start a sprint with a real sprint planning meeting. Thou shalt always end a sprint with working code, which thine customers and stakeholders shall comment upon. If thine daily stand-up meeting goes longer than 15 minutes, then lo! Someone needs to put a cork in it. Agile keeps the list of ceremonies small, and the ceremonies themselves fairly lightweight. They serve the same purpose as any ritual, to encourage both right behavior and right thinking. Unfortunately, there are not enough of them. Agile ceremonies must reach beyond the team The founders of the Agile movement Read more

Oct 102012
 

I recently watched a talk by a self-appointed agile "expert" who tried to explain the key elements of Scrum. There were lots of minor and major mistakes in his presentation, but the sentence that struck me most was: "User stories are what we call requirements in agile." The sad thing is not that much that this guy said was completely wrong, but that his view is quite common. Another "Scrum" team I was visiting recently showed me its task board. On the left, the group had "prioritized" their stories by assigning them to three categories. Their choice was pretty representative: they had eight cards with priority one, three cards with priority two, and not a Read more

Aug 012012
 

August has officially arrived, which means the annual Agile conference is just two short weeks away. Whether you’re doing Agile, thinking about doing Agile, or are a leading Agile thinker, you’re aware of this event. This year’s conference, Agile2012, is headed to Dallas, Texas. The weather promises to be about 100°, so don’t forget to bring your hat and sun block (under 3.4 ounces if you’re carrying on)! I’m pleased to report that eight members of the Cutter Consortium Agile team are presenting at Agile2012. Led by Dr. Israel Gat, Director of our Agile Practice, Cutter’s team is ready to help you make the most of your Agile2012 experience. Dr. Gat’s “No Bull Know How” Read more

Nov 022011
 

Over the past twelve months, many diverse organizations worldwide have benefited from Cutter Consortium’s considerable expertise in conducting technical debt assessments. According to our experts Israel Gat and Chris Sterling, many of the findings and recommendations made during these engagements are broadly applicable in concept. The new Executive Update “Delving into Technical Debt” explores the considerations that most organizations go through while devising a technical debt reduction strategy. (You can register and download a complimentary copy of this 11-page report using promotion code DELVING.) From typical opportunities that arise during a technical debt assessment to common areas that need improvement, and from creating a technical debt mitigation strategy to leveraging the open source software quality Read more

Mar 242011
 

Agile software development and agile project management have shown considerable success in helping organizations develop better software and better manage development projects in the face of changing requirements and evolving technologies. In one sense, agile is about managing rapidly changing project factors and requirements. But enterprises face many other factors that must also be accounted for in project management and development. For example, enterprises need to manage quality, reduce technical debt, and control the total cost of ownership for each individual project. In addition, they need to manage overall IT costs, complexity, and consistency across all projects. These are factors that architecture is in place to address but, unfortunately, these aspects of software engineering and Read more

Dec 032010
 

What do I see for 2011? In 2011, we’ll continue to see Agile adoption increase, and the price and scale of certification will drop even more. I still think (as I predicted for 2010), that as companies regroup post-recession, they will firm up co-located, on-shore development and that any growth in off-shore efforts will be in the form of increased business representation. [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the annual “Cutter Predicts …” series, compiled at the Cutter Consortium website.]