Posts Tagged 'Artificial Intelligence'

Nov 142017
 
Insurtech: Processes are Ripe for Disruption

Recently, Cutter Fellow Steve Andriole took a wide look at insurtech. His insight, and a collection of articles on the topic, appear in a recent issue of Cutter Business Technology Journal (CBTJ). What exactly is insurtech? According to Investopedia, insurtech refers to: the use of technology innovations designed to squeeze out savings and efficiency from the current insurance industry model.… The belief driving insurtech companies is that the insurance industry is ripe for innovation and disruption.” Steve Andriole has a unique perspective on insurtech having served as CTO and Senior VP for Technology Strategy at CIGNA Corporation, a $20 billion global insurance and financial services company. Writes Steve: The insurance industry is very quickly evolving, Read more

Jul 212016
 
Call for Papers - Cognitive Computing: The Future Has Arrived!

In the 1980s, everyone got excited about the possibility of artificial intelligence. The excitement grew for a few years and then gradually faded as companies found that it was too hard to build and maintain useful expert systems or natural language interfaces. However, there has been a renewed interest in developing software applications that can interact with people in natural languages, perform complex decision-making tasks, or assist human experts in complex analysis efforts. Today these systems are called cognitive computing systems or machine learning. They rely on research from artificial intelligence laboratories and use new techniques like deep learning and reinforcement which seem to overcome some of the problems that were encountered with earlier AI Read more

May 032016
 
Five Perspectives on Cognitive Computing

Cognitive computing is among the major trends in computing today and seems destined to change how business people think about the ways in which computers can be used in business environments. “Cognitive computing” is a vague term used in a myriad of ways. Given the confusion in the market as to the nature of cognitive computing, our recent Executive Report (Part I in a two-part series) describes what we mean by cognitive computing by exploring five different perspectives on the topic: (1) rules-based expert systems, (2) big data and data mining, (3) neural networks, (4) IBM’s Watson, and (5) Google’s AlphaGo. Here is a brief description of each. Rules-Based Expert Systems There have been other attempts to commercialize artificial intelligence Read more

Mar 262016
 

Life complexifies. Perhaps it is a fundamental law of information that the complexity of information increases. In the world of biology, over time organisms become more complex, with new genetic permutations appearing alongside of old genetic pieces. In the hyperastronomical space in the animal genome, nature constantly produces new combinations. In human knowledge and scientific discovery, the same is true. New insights are built on top of old ones. Breakthroughs in insight usually have higher levels of complexity and hence require higher levels of abstraction and difficult codification to accommodate the widening domain covered. We all know E=MC2 but how many of us really know what it means? In the world of medicine, treatments are Read more

Mar 172013
 

Even if you don’t play chess, you are likely to enjoy Gary Kasparov’s recent article The Chess Master and the Computer. Gary writes on the complicated subject of  intelligence  and the human mind in a clear, jargon free language. I would dare say his article is as incisive as the way he plays chess. For the Agilist, (and for anyone who takes interest in knowledge work), Gary cuts to the heart of the matter recounting the following episode: In 2005, the online chess-playing site Playchess.com hosted what it called a “freestyle” chess tournament in which anyone could compete in teams with other players or computers. Normally, “anti-cheating” algorithms are employed by online sites to prevent, or Read more